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File:STS-133 crew arrival.jpg|The crew pose for a photo at the KSC (including Bowen).
 
File:STS-133 crew arrival.jpg|The crew pose for a photo at the KSC (including Bowen).
 
File:Sts133 mission poster.jpg|Mission poster (with Kopra instead of Bowen).
 
File:Sts133 mission poster.jpg|Mission poster (with Kopra instead of Bowen).
File:President Obama Meets With STS-133 Crew.jpg|Lindsey, far left, presents a montage to Barack Obama as crew members Barratt, Boe, Stott and Bowen look on.
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File:President Obama Meets With STS-133 Crew.jpg|Lindsey, far left, presents a montage to [[Barack Obama]] as crew members Barratt, Boe, Stott and Bowen look on.
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
   
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===Orbital Maneuvering System vapor leak===
 
===Orbital Maneuvering System vapor leak===
On 14 October 2010, engineers at the launch pad first discovered a small leak in a propellant line for ''Discovery''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s orbital maneuvering system (OMS) engines. The leak was detected after they noticed a fishy smell coming from the aft of the shuttle, thought of as a sign of fuel vapor in the air.<ref name="vapor leak">{{cite web|url=http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2010/10/sts-133-tcdt-completed-troubleshooting-leaky-flight-cap/|title=STS-133: TCDT completed – Engineers troubleshooting leaky flight cap|author=Chris Bergin|publisher=NASAspaceflight.com|date=15 October 2010|accessdate=19 October 2010}}</ref> Upon inspection, the leak was found at a flange located at the interface where two propellant lines met in ''Discovery''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s aft compartment. The line carried [[monomethyl hydrazine]] (MMH) propellant, one of two chemicals (the other is an oxidizer, nitrogen tetroxide) used to ignite the OMS engines. Engineers replaced an Air Half Coupling (AHC) flight cap. However, the new cap failed to solve the problem since vapor checks still showed signs of a leak. An aspirator was activated to collect the vapor at the leak-site allowing work to continue in other locations around the aft segment of ''Discovery''.
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On 14 October 2010, engineers at the launch pad first discovered a small leak in a propellant line for ''Discovery''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s orbital maneuvering system (OMS) engines. The leak was detected after they noticed a fishy smell coming from the aft of the shuttle, thought of as a sign of fuel vapor in the air.<ref name="vapor leak">{{cite web|url=http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2010/10/sts-133-tcdt-completed-troubleshooting-leaky-flight-cap/|title=STS-133: TCDT completed – Engineers troubleshooting leaky flight cap|author=Chris Bergin|publisher=NASAspaceflight.com|date=15 October 2010|accessdate=19 October 2010}}</ref> Upon inspection, the leak was found at a flange located at the interface where two propellant lines met in ''Discovery''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s aft compartment. The line carried [[monomethyl hydrazine]] (MMH) propellant, one of two chemicals (the other is an oxidizer, [[nitrogen tetroxide]]) used to ignite the OMS engines. Engineers replaced an Air Half Coupling (AHC) flight cap. However, the new cap failed to solve the problem since vapor checks still showed signs of a leak. An aspirator was activated to collect the vapor at the leak-site allowing work to continue in other locations around the aft segment of ''Discovery''.
   
 
It was believed that the leak was in the crossfeed flange area – a problem with associated seals. On 18 October 2010, after an afternoon review, engineers were asked to double-check the torque on six bolts around the suspected leaky flange fitting and tighten if necessary.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts133/101018leak/|title=Technicians working on tiny fuel leak in Discovery pod
 
It was believed that the leak was in the crossfeed flange area – a problem with associated seals. On 18 October 2010, after an afternoon review, engineers were asked to double-check the torque on six bolts around the suspected leaky flange fitting and tighten if necessary.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts133/101018leak/|title=Technicians working on tiny fuel leak in Discovery pod
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